News Article

Officers' commitment to equality

Recently, the University have reiterated a commitment to tackling issues specifically and disproportionately affecting students of colour such as the BME attainment gap; issues the elected Officers for 2017/18 are also keen to address.

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Last year, as part of a series of protests and direct actions against a Eurocentric and whitewashed curriculum, the King’s People of Colour Association (formerly known as King’s Ethnic Minority Association) undertook a direct action called ‘Blackout the White Wall’, in response to the ‘Meet the Professors’ wall at the Strand campus. 

As a result, King’s alumni and current NUS Women’s officer, Hareem Ghani, and the former King's College London Students' Union (KCLSU) Women’s Lead Officer, Zahra Butt, set up the ‘Wall of BAME’ to celebrate the success and breadth of talent of women of colour within King’s. In response to the feedback from students of colour, the ‘Meet the Professors’ wall images have been updated to reflect and represent the achievements of BAME professors at King’s. 

Recently, the University have reiterated a commitment to tackling issues specifically and disproportionately affecting students of colour, such as the BME attainment gap; issues the elected Officers for 2017/18 are also keen to address. 

Commenting on this the KCLSU Officers' team said, "We welcome the College’s commitment to tackling issues related to BAME students in particular, many of whom feel marginalised and isolated from the wider community. We hope that the university continues to commit to vital issues, alongside listening to the voice of its students, much like those who established the Wall of BAME in the first place.

We want to also take this opportunity to welcome new and returning students back to university, and to let them know that we, as a students’ union, hold issues relating to BAME students as a priority.

We’d like to end by thanking those students who campaigned for the Wall of BAME, as their protests and labour was what got us this first step in highlighting issues on the ground, that may have otherwise gone ignored."